Good news for UK self-publishers…?

It’s been a while since my last post, due to a series of unfortunate life events that have also led me to change the way I offer my editing services. Currently, I am only working with existing clients and new clients whose manuscripts do not exceed 50,000 words; however, this is not the good news I wanted to mention…

Something called KDP Jumpstart came to my attention recently. It’s been a few years since I have self-published on Amazon and as Iโ€™ve not been keeping up to date I thought I should investigate.

It used to be that if you wanted to self-publish through Amazon you used their CreateSpace platform for paperback books and their Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) platform for e-books.

KDP now offer the means to publish paperback books. You can even transfer previously published books from the CreateSpace platform to KDP, quoting the original ISBN used. This will disable it on CreateSpace, and they say this is not reversible. KDP do not support CreateSpace’s Expanded Distribution, so if this is important to you, they suggest keeping the book on CreateSpace. As far as I recall, there is no Expanded Distribution available in the UK with CreateSpace; itโ€™s only available in the US, but I could be wrong.

Some years ago, I self-published a book of short stories on CreateSpace, using their free ISBN number. I won’t digress into the ISBN conundrum here, but I had been thinking about republishing using a UK ISBN. I shall do so, using this new KDP platform.

Although I have not completed the process yet, I believe that once you have set up a new paperback with KDP โ€“ or transferred a previous one from CreateSpace โ€“ you can then choose your nearest distribution centre from within the UK when ordering member copies of the book.

I can see advantages for UK authors when using this new platform. It provides an opportunity to set up a replacement publication using an UK ISBN, rather than a CreateSpace one, and if potential customers order your book directly from a UK bookshop, the retailer should not refuse to order copies that are sourced from the UK. (They have refused to order books that have to be shipped from the US, as costs do not make it financially viable.) Whether this will be worthwhile for the author will still depend on the costs for printing and shipping, but presumably this will be cheaper and more economical than having books supplied from the US.

Once I have explored further, I will either update this post or create a new one, but if anyone has any useful comments about this new service, please let me know and I can include them.

๐Ÿ™‚